Make your own free website on Tripod.com













Just a small list of Tributes to some of Reggae Greats.










Marcia Griffiths the Queen of Reggae

Jamaica's longest-running and perhaps biggest female vocalist ever. Griffiths began as a teenager in Coxsone's Studio One, racking up hit after hit, then joined with paramour Bob Andy as Bob & Marcia for the Top Five U.K. pop hit "Young, Gifted and Black." She formed The I Threes to back Bob Marley's international tours and recordings from 1974-1980 and scored a massive international hit with "Electric Boogie" in the '80s. Despite a few '70s Rasta tunes like "Stepping out of Babylon," she is known primarily for her strong, smooth-as-mousse love songs and captivating live performances. marcia was born  in Kingston, jamaica on November 23, 1949. There is so much more on Marcia's website FYI.















       Ken Boothe
Born in Denham Town, Kingston on March 22, 1948, Ken Boothe  was one of the most popular and soulful singers of the rocksteady era, arguably second only to Alton Ellis. Where Ellis was silky smooth, Boothe's vocals were deeper and grittier, earning him a reputation as Jamaica's answer to Wilson Pickett. First rising to popularity as part of a ska duo with Stranger Cole, Boothe forged a solo career on Clement "Coxsone" Dodd's Studio One label during rocksteady's prime, building a generous part of his repertoire on American soul covers. Even after the advent of Rastafarian roots reggae, he managed to score further hits with other producers, most notably the U.K. chart-topper "Everything I Own."   Ken with his friend Winston "Stranger" Cole cut several singles for Duke Reid and Leslie Kong before hitting their stride on Clement "Coxsone" Dodd's Studio One label with a string of ska hits over 1963-1965: "World's Fair," "Artibella," "Hush," "Thick in Your Love," "All Your Friends." Dodd encouraged Boothe to record as a solo artist, and he and Cole both embarked on solo careers.

Boothe's first solo single for Studio One was 1966's "You're No Good," and he notched his first solo hit that year with "The Train Is Coming," a soulful rocksteady track (with backing by the Wailers) that established him as one of the new style's hottest new stars. He quickly solidified that position with another smash, "Feel Good." Buoyed by his good looks and heartthrob appeal, Boothe tore off a long string of hits over the next few years: "I Don't Want to See You Cry," "Everybody Knows," "Just Another Girl," "Moving Away," "Come Tomorrow," "Mustang Sally," and "Puppet on a String" among them. Some were covers of American and British rock and soul tunes, and most were for Dodd, although Boothe did take brief sojourns to other producers: Sonia Pottinger (1968's "Say You"), Keith Hudson ("Old Fashioned Way"), and Phil Pratt ("I'm Not for Sale," "Can't Fight Me Down"). Also in 1968, Boothe issued the first of several albums for Studio One, Mr. Rock Steady, which gathered some of his previous hits.

In 1970, Boothe moved over to Leslie Kong's Beverley's imprint, where he cut several hits in "Freedom Street," "Why Baby Why," and "Now I Know." Following Kong's untimely death, Boothe recorded for several other producers in quick succession, landing the hit "Silver Words" for Winston "Niney" Holness. Boothe truly struck gold, however, when he teamed up with producer Lloyd Charmers on the U.K. Trojan label in 1971. The association started to bear fruit with two albums, 1973's Black Gold and Green and 1974's Let's Get It On (after the titular Marvin Gaye cover). Then, later in 1974, Charmers suggested that Boothe cover the Bread hit "Everything I Own." Released as a single, Boothe's version became a left-field pop smash in the U.K., going all the way to number one. His 1975 follow-up, "Crying Over You," nearly made the Top Ten, and the Everything I Own album also sold well.

Unfortunately, Boothe's success wasn't enough to keep Trojan from suspending operations due to financial difficulties. The resulting split with Charmers left him unable to consolidate his crossover success, and he recorded only sporadically over the next few years. When Trojan returned in 1978, Boothe and Charmers reunited for a few more recordings (including Blood Brothers and Who Gets Your Love), but couldn't match their earlier success, and again went their separate ways. Boothe returned to the studio from time to time during the '80s, releasing the occasional single and often re-recording his Studio One material. He had a few comeback hits over 1986-1987, including the Tapper Zukie-produced "Don't You Know." UB40 covered several of his songs on their Labour of Love albums, and in 1995, he teamed with crossover star Shaggy for a new version of "The Train Is Coming," which appeared on the soundtrack of Money Train. A double-disc overview of his Trojan years, Crying Over You, was released by the label in 2001.

Ken Boothe was one of the most popular and soulful singers of the rocksteady era, arguably second only to Alton Ellis. Where Ellis was silky smooth, Boothe's vocals were deeper and grittier, earning him a reputation as Jamaica's answer to Wilson Pickett. First rising to popularity as part of a ska duo with Stranger Cole, Boothe forged a solo career on Clement "Coxsone" Dodd's Studio One label during rocksteady's prime, building a generous part of his repertoire on American soul covers. Even after the advent of Rastafarian roots reggae, he managed to score further hits with other producers, most notably the U.K. chart-topper "Everything I Own."











Freddie McGregor

McGregor was born in Clarendon, Jamaica on June 27, 1956. At age seven, he started singing backup for a local ska harmony duo called the Clarendonians (naturally, with the nickname of Little Freddie McGregor). The Clarendonians recorded for producer Clement "Coxsone" Dodd's legendary Studio One label for a time, and when they split in the mid-'60s, McGregor teamed up with ex-member Ernest "Fitzroy" Wilson to form a new duo, Freddie and Fitzroy. They recorded several single sides, including "Why Did You Do It" and "Do Good and Good Will Follow You." McGregor stayed at Studio One for much of the '70s, working as a session drummer and backup singer while developing his own vocal style, which owed much to smooth, Philadelphia-style soul. He sang lead for groups like Generation Gap and Soul Syndicate, and also recorded off and on as a solo act during the '70s, though always in the singles medium. During this period, he began writing some of his own material, including songs like "Go Away Pretty Woman," "Tomorrow Is Like Today," and "What Difference Does It Make." 


In 1981, McGregor scored a huge hit single with "Big Ship," which catapulted him to the front rank of reggae stars in the immediate post-Marley era, along with Dennis Brown and Gregory Isaacs. His next LP arrived in 1982, also titled Big Ship, and featured production by Linval Thompson and musical backing by the Roots Radics. It too was highly successful, both creatively and commercially. Signing with Ras for 1983's Come On Over, McGregor extended his creative hot streak to an international audience, making a name for himself in the U.K. and U.S. His 1984 follow-up Across the Border was a slightly poppier effort that contained his hit reggae cover of "Guantanamera." Continuing in this crossover vein, in hopes of surviving amid the dancehall revolution, McGregor released All in the Same Boat in 1986; it produced a major hit in "Push Come to Shove," which became his first U.K. chart entry. He sparked the interest of Polydor Records, and found further U.K. success with "That Girl" and a cover of the Main Ingredient's "Just Don't Want to Be Lonely," which made the U.K. Top Ten in 1987.

Freddie McGregor is one of reggae's most durable and soulful singers, with an incredibly steady career that started all the way back in the '60s, when he was just seven years old. Since then, he's spanned nearly every stylistic shift in Jamaican music, from ska and rocksteady to Rastafarian roots reggae to lovers rock (his particular specialty) to dabblings in dancehall, ragga, and dub. Not just a singer, he wrote some of his own material, and grew into an accomplished producer as well. McGregor's heyday was the early '80s, when he released several high-quality albums and reached the peak of his popularity in Jamaica and England. However, he remained a strong presence on the reggae scene well into the new millennium.  Take a tour to his website for more Freddie!















Beres Hammond

One of the most underappreciated reggae artists of his time, Beres Hammond is a soulful crooner indebted to classic rocksteady and American R&B, one who preferred live instrumentation and writes much of his own material. Hammond specialized in romantic lovers rock, but he also found time to delve into light dancehall, conscious roots reggae, hip-hop fusion, and straight-up contemporary R&B. He was born Hugh Beresford Hammond on August 28, 1955, in Annotto Bay, in the Jamaican province of St. Mary. Hammond grew up listening to his father's collection of American R&B (Sam Cooke, Otis Redding, Marvin Gaye, etc.) and jazz, and also fell in love with native Jamaican music during the ska and rocksteady eras; his primary influence was Alton Ellis, and he also listened to the likes of Peter Tosh, the Heptones, and Ken Boothe.

Over 1972-1973, Hammond performed successfully in talent competitions, one of which led to his first recording, a soul cover of Ellis' "Wanderer." In 1975, Hammond joined the group Zap Pow as lead singer; they enjoyed a hit single in 1978 with "The System." Meanwhile, Hammond was already exploring the idea of a solo career, cutting his debut album, Soul Reggae, with producer Willie Lindo in 1976. Urged by his label, Aquarius, to pick a song for single release, Hammond instead returned to the studio and cut a new track, the ballad "One Step Ahead." It was a massive chart-topping hit in Jamaica, and so was his second single, 1978's Joe Gibbs-produced "I'm in Love." Hammond left Zap Pow in 1979 to concentrate on his solo career. He recorded his second solo album, Just a Man, with Gibbs in 1980, and reunited with Lindo for 1981's Comin' at You.

Following the 1985 album Let's Make a Song, he founded his own label, Harmony House, to ensure that he would have an outlet whenever arrangements with other companies fell through. The first two singles, "Groovy Little Thing" and the Willie Lindo-produced "What One Dance Can Do," were both major hits that nodded to the emerging dancehall style, and the latter not only started to break him in the international market, but proved to be his biggest Jamaican hit ever. A self-titled album also appeared in 1986, and he scored another hit with "Settling Down."

Reuniting with Willie Lindo in N.Y., Hammond set to work on the ballad-heavy Have a Nice Week End, and also teamed with emerging crossover star Maxi Priest for the 1988 duet "How Can We Ease the Pain." In the wake of Hurricane Gilbert, Hammond returned to Jamaica and recorded the tougher Putting Up Resistance with producer Tappa Zukie, which was released in 1989 and spawned a significant hit in the title track and a popular follow-up in "Strange." Hammond made his return permanent in 1990, signing with the Penthouse label and teaming that year with producer Donovan Germain for the enormous dancehall hit "Tempting to Touch." Perhaps his best-known song in the U.K. and U.S., "Tempting to Touch" topped the charts in Jamaica and paved the way for 1992's hit A Love Affair album, which included further hits in "Is This a Sign" and "Respect to You Baby."

Now attracting interest from larger labels, Hammond wrote and recorded prolifically in the '90s, and produced fairly consistent results. Sweetness appeared in 1993 on VP, and 1994 brought In Control, a set on American major Elektra that was geared toward the international market. VP distributed his 1996 Harmony House album Love From a Distance, which made him one of the most popular lovers rock artists around, and Heartbeat handled the 1997 follow-up Getting Stronger. 1998 brought A Day in the Life... on VP, after which Hammond took a few years' break from his frantic recording pace.  Hammond returned to the studio in 2001 for Music Is Life, which featured a guest spot from rapper Wyclef Jean. Love Has No Boundaries was released in 2004 on VP Records, and included guest spots by Buju Banton and Big Youth, among others and Beres is still making great music . . . . . . .

















More & More Tributes  ~











Home  ]  ~  [  Email  ]


Prymetyme@2009